Speed dating for real people

READ MORE: Top 5 ways Ontario government can cool the hot Toronto-area housing market“When she first introduced the idea to me, I was probably one of the only ones who really endorsed it,” he said.“It makes sense.

It’s not that difficult from a financing perspective, but for some reason, people shy away because it’s a little unorthodox.”About 25 people attended the event and were given a list of questions to ask prospective buyers.

It works for romance, so I think it could work for a mortgage.”WATCH: It might seem unconventional concept, but real estate matchmaking could be a new housing option. Gaynor said prospective buyers would combine financial resources to purchase real estate in Toronto.“I combine my revenue with your revenue and your income with my income, we have more buying power and then we buy a property,” she said.

The former social worker turned real estate agent said while it seems unconventional, the idea of sharing space with strangers happens more often than you might think.

Gaynor said she’s had the idea for a long time because she herself co-owned a home with a friend in the early 90s. More recently, the speed-dating element came to Gaynor when she was joking with her three sons about how they can now use apps like Tinder to find a date, then it hit her: “Why couldn’t we use something similar to hook people up — to buy a property together?

” “It helps people increase their net worth, and it’s not just about a landlord making money off of your rent,” she said.

They’re given a list of questions to ask each other. “I haven’t seen many co-ownership deals,” she responds, adding that she would like to find a home in the Beaches area. The housing matchmaker behind this event is Lesli Gaynor, a social worker-turned-Royal Le Page realtor who launched a company called Go Co Solutions to help people get into Toronto’s red-hot real estate market through co-ownership.

Karen Turner and Kelly Wilk just co-purchased a home in the upper Beaches area of Toronto.

Both in their late 30s, they have been friends since they were roommates during first year university.

They take a seat at the long table, where they have a few minutes to chat before the bell rings and it's time to move on to their next "date." "I'm an investor," one man with multiple properties in Canada and Asia declares to the young woman sitting across from him. Her other criteria: "Close to transit," which she writes on her name tag. The average selling price in the Greater Toronto Area in May was 3,910, up from 2,100 the same month last year.

Gaynor said she's had the idea for a long time because she herself co-owned a home with a friend in the early 90s. More recently, the speed-dating element came to Gaynor when she was joking with her three sons about how they can now use apps like Tinder to find a date, then it hit her: "Why couldn't we use something similar to hook people up — to buy a property together?

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